How Can I Help?

Neil November 23 2107All of us, at some point or another, are subject to the various laws governing our everyday lives, and the truth is that there are no exceptions to this rule, anywhere.

When I say our lives, I refer of course to our working conditions, proprietary rights, health concerns, financial standing, contractual protections, familial obligations, civil liberties and the inherent freedom to bequeath as we see fit. In most, if not all of these scenarios, we are likewise required to instruct or at the very least, consult a qualified (solicitor, lawyer, or attorney) so as to obtain a professional opinion of our dilemma, along with a plan as to how best to address the problem in hand.

Unfortunately for the majority of us, this process equates to heavy financial risk and potentially spiralling costs when looking to pursue a matter through to its conclusion; a sadly endemic barrier that subsequently prevents proper and achievable litigation outside of a courtroom, while the appointed legal representative is typically free to recover their fees, despite a perhaps unfavourable outcome for the client, particularly within civil litigation cases (see the second part of my academic paper for more on this disconcerting subject).

This ‘legal blockage’ is further exacerbated by the reality that law practices need to employ a number of staff, as well as leasing or purchasing a suitable location from which to operate, and so as the pending caseloads increase, so too does the inability to provide total client-focussed dedication, which proves itself an unavoidable burden, and one that can also render the client insecure as to what’s actually happening, and why certain actions or decisions are pertinent to the matter investigated.

This is where the Black Letter Law Consultant reinvents the now-outdated model of client and legal professional relationships.

Because I am able to operate beyond the confines of domestic legal practice, my skills as a law scholar, writer and natural advocate allow me to set my own service fees, deliver information to my clients in a way that both educates and reassures them at every step, and construct a plan that will inevitably save them both time and money in the process.

I would also add that I would not advise any of my clients to pursue an avenue where the outcome is unavoidably against their best interests, which is a policy and work ethic wholly representative of my innate belief that any adviser or consultant operates within a fiduciary framework, and one requiring that the leading party must shoulder those virtues when assisting any and all clients, a virtue that is all too often neglected in many similar industries, and ignored in favour of commercial advantage when things become challenging, as they often will.

Instead, I seek to forge powerful partnerships with all of my clients, while holding front and centre the knowledge that their vulnerability is mine to protect at all times. This has carried me very well in life thus far, and it’s an asset that I would automatically seek in any legal professional or service provider, especially given the complexities of law in all its guises, but before I wax lyrical about the trapdoors of poor legal advice, let me show below a few examples of where I can be of invaluable assistance prior to needing to possibly instruct a solicitor/lawyer/attorney:

(i) You have been accused of a criminal offence and yet you know that it wasn’t your fault.

(ii) You have a neighbour who is causing you anxiety and anger through their allegations of boundary ownership and other associated means.

(iii) You have been dismissed and believe you were treated unfairly.

(iv) You are looking to update or revise your will and are unsure what obligations you will be subject to, and how best to negate contentious claimants should they appear during its execution.

(v) You wish to develop, sell or buy a property, and have since been advised of some technicalities that may have serious consequences upon your decision-making, or you have discovered elements within the title deeds that are unclear and in need urgent explanation.

(vi) You have been injured at work or in public and are unsure as to your rights.

(vii) You are being subjected to threatening letters from other solicitors for reasons that are unclear or make no sense.

(viii) You are looking to end your marriage and are unsure as to how best to proceed.

(ix) You are looking to stay in the country and have no idea how to protect yourself if faced with pending deportation.

In addition to the above, there are obviously countless scenarios in which you might seek legal counsel, but where you also know that it will be arguably expensive and more often than not, slow to proceed, and so this is the point where I would implore you to get in contact with me via contact@blackletter.co.uk or on +44(0)7771 333801 and allow me to help you assert your position quickly and learn what your options are in no uncertain terms.