R (Rogers) v Swindon NHS Primary Care Trust (2006)

English Medical Law

 

R (Rogers) v Swindon NHS Primary Care Trust
‘In the Pink!’ by Shelley Ashkowski

Irrationality and subsequent weakness of policy become the key ingredients of this appeal case between an individual and local NHS trust when a breast cancer patient is diagnosed with a particular form of metastasis and the consultant responsible for their treatment prescribes a medicine that while proven to significantly prevent the progression of this specific virus, is a brand still yet to undergo full inclusion within the regulatory core of acceptable National Health Service medicines.

After the patient volunteered to self-fund her course of treatment, the spiralling costs quickly proved overwhelming, at which point she applied to her regional Primary Care Trust to request funding (an action not frowned upon in certain circumstances).

When the trust refused to provide any financial assistance on grounds that the drug used was not officially recognised and therefore subject to certain qualifying criteria, the appellant sought to challenge the refusal through judicial review, citing an inherent failure to properly establish sound reasons for non-funding, despite statistical supportive evidence, first-hand testimony and a general position of endorsement by the Secretary of State for Health.

When examined in the Court of Appeal, the emerging facts showed a lack of collective agreement as to exactly why funding for this specific treatment would be prohibited, along with an erring of caution to offer those funds. However this proved a baseless hesitation when held against the ‘ethical over monetary’ line taken by the Health Secretary (and regulatory bodies) and their drive for swift inclusion of this new weapon in the fight against breast cancer.

Upon ruling in favour of the patient, it was advised by the Court that far from being in any position to ‘rubber stamp’ the uninterrupted sponsoring of the appellant’s course of treatment, it was left to the Primary Care Trust and ruling bodies to further refine their criteria for approved patient administration in order that future prescriptions would avoid undue objections during the uptake of other medicines, while holding that:

“People have equal rights of access to health care, but there may be times when some categories of care are given priority in order to address health inequalities in the community.”