The Pork section is now finished.

Our Favourite Recipes: A Cookbook for Food Lovers

Pork

I’m happy to report that this chapter of the ‘Our Favourite Recipes: A Cookbook for Food Lovers’ is now ready, and so now its time for me to start working on the ‘vegetables’ section (far and away the biggest part of the book), therefore it will no doubt take me a while to complete it, but as with food itself, ‘all good things come to those who wait’, and so in the interim, below is a list of the delicious pork recipes that will be included in the finished product. I hope that you will ultimately enjoy cooking and eating them as much as I have writing them up.

(1) Balsamic Roasted Sausages with Vegetables

(2) Cart Drivers’ Spaghetti

(3) Cumberland Sausage and Split-pea Casserole

(4) Fusilli All’ Amatriciana

(5) Goan Pork Curry with Potatoes

(6) Kerala Pork Curry

(7) Lancashire Hotpot

(8) Pasta with Asparagus,Cream and Ham Sauce

(9) Penne with Sausage Sauce

(10) Pork and Butternut Squash Curry Pork Curry

(11) Pork Dopiaza

(12) Pork Fillet in Honey and Ginger

(13) Pork in a Mustard Spice Mix

(14) Pork Kapitan

(15) Pork Vindaloo

(16) Spaghetti Carbonara

(17) Spicy Sichuan Pork with Noodles

(18) Stir-Fried Pork Mince with Basil

(19) Stir-Fried Pork Mince with Mushrooms

(20) Tagliatelle with Minced Pork Sauce

(21) Yellow Pork Curry

Italian Meatballs

Food Blogs and Recipes

Italian Meatballs
‘With Meatballs on Top’ by JJ Galloway

The staple meal in any Italian household, only made to our particular tastes, this is a dinner that is well worth the wait, and I would recommend you wear some kind of napkins or kitchen paper over your clothes to avoid any mess. There is no doubt that this is a lip-smacking dinner which wins with children and adults alike, and any leftovers (and there rarely is) can be easily frozen for later use.

Ingredients (Serves 4)
Large Slug of Olive Oil
2 400g Packs of Beef Meatballs
240-300g Pack of Bacon
Medium Onion (Finely Chopped
2 Garlic cloves (Peeled and Grated)
Beef Stock Cube
2 Tsps Tomato Purée
2 Sun-Dried Tomatoes (Finely Chopped)
500g Tomato Passata
3 Whole Tomatoes (Quartered)
Tsp Dried Oregano
Tsp Dried Basil
Tsp Dried Parsley
2 Bay Leaves
Small 187ml Bottle Red Wine
25g Pack Fresh Basil (Finely Chopped)
Tsp Salt and Freshly Ground Pepper

How to Cook

  1. Finely dice the bacon after removing any unwanted fat and then after heating the oil in a non-stick chef pan (or similar), gently fry the onions and garlic until soft and slightly brown.
  1. Add both the meatballs and bacon and brown both meats slowly on a gently heat, stirring occasionally.
  1. Add the oregano, basil, parsley, beef stock cube, salt and pepper, sound-dried tomatoes, tomato purée and sun-dried tomatoes and bay leaves then stir-fry for 1-2 minutes.
  1. Pour in the red wine and tomato passata, stir well and simmer for 3-4 minutes  before adding the quartered tomatoes, covering the pan and simmering gently for 1 to 1.5 hours, stirring occasionally to prevent sticking.
  1. Just before serving, add the chopped basil and mix well.

Comments
It goes without saying that meatballs are best served with spaghetti or linguini, however you can also use penne or fusilli if preferred. In fact, most shaped pastas work equally well, while remembering to grate plenty of freshly grated parmesan or romano (pecorino) cheese over the top (as long as your diners are in agreement) along with extra salt and pepper where required.

 

The Fish section is now finished.

Our Favourite Recipes: A Cookbook for Food Lovers

Fish

With thirty dishes to enjoy, I am very pleased to announce that this third chapter of the book is now complete, and so here below is a list of the recipes just waiting to be cooked and hopefully digested with gleeful satisfaction:

(1) Bengali Mustard Salmon

(2) Chickpea and Cod Stew

(3) Creamy Pasta with Basil and Salmon

(4) Fish Pie

(5) Grilled Cod with Spring Onion Mash

(6) Haddock with Creamed Leeks, Beans and Parsley

(7) Linguini with Salmon and Fresh Dill

(8) Linguini with Tuna Fish Sauce

(9) Macaroni with Sardines and Fennel

(10) Mackerel and Potato Curry

(11) Mackerel, Potato and Thyme Bake

(12) Monkfish with Garlic and Sage

(13) Omelette Arnold Bennett

(14) Pasta with Broccoli and Anchovies

(15) Pasta with Mackerel and Pine Nuts

(16) Pearl Barley and Mackerel Kedgeree

(17) Roasted Haddock with Fennel, Mustard and Ginger

(18)  Roasted Monkfish with Watercress Potatoes

(19) Red Mullet Penne

(20) Salmon Burgers with Basil Mayonnaise

(21) Salmon Parcels

(22) Salmon Quiche

(23) Sea Bass with Basil Pepperonata

(24) Smoked Haddock Kedgeree

(25) Smoked Mackerel and Potato Bake

(26) Spaghetti Atterrati

(27) Spaghetti with Onion, Tuna and Anchovies

(28) Spaghetti with Pizzaiola Sauce

(29) Tagliatelle with Tuna, Lemon and Rocket

(30) Tuna, Pasta and Garlic

 

The Beef and Chicken sections are now finished.

Our Favourite Recipes: A Cookbook for Food Lovers

Having now written up the first two sections of the cookbook, I thought I would share the contents here should anybody be curious to know which dishes will be covered. I admit  that I’m not a big beef eater, so there are naturally more chicken-based recipes, and as you will also see I am an ardent lover of curries too. I can also assure you that all of these recipes have been thoroughly road-tested, and will not disappoint once cooked and served up, and the theme here is about quality and not quantity, therefore each of these dishes easily speak for themselves.

On a personal level I’m very excited about this cookbook, and will stress that it’s been a genuine labour of love both cooking and adapting them ahead of my putting everything in one convenient point of reference.

Content-wise, my current estimations indicate there will be a total of 245+ recipes when the book is finished next spring/summer, and rest assured, there will plenty of dishes to  sink your teeth into when it’s finally published (if you’ll excuse the pun) and as each section is completed I will list their contents here first.

Beef


Beef Recipes


(1) Beef Bourguignon

(2) Beef Goulash

(3) Beef and Potato Curry

(4) Chilli-Con-Carne

(5) Curried Meatballs

(6) Curried Mince Beef with Peas

(7) Homemade Beefburgers

(8) Italian Meatballs

(9) Lasagne

(10) Shepherd’s Pie

(11) Spaghetti Bolognese

Chicken


Chicken Recipes


(1) Baked Cardamom Chicken Curry

(2) Bengali Chicken

(3) Braised Chicken Curry

(4) Burmese Chicken Curry

(5) Caribbean Chicken Curry

(6) Chettinad Chicken Curry

(7) Chicken and Basil Fried Rice

(8) Chicken with Black Bean Sauce

(9) Chicken and Cardamom Curry

(10) Chicken and Green Bean Curry

(11) Chicken Kukupaka

(12) Chicken Stew

(13) Chicken Vindaloo

(14) Coconut and Soy Chicken

(15) Coriander Chicken

(16) Crispy Chicken and Tomatoes

(17) Delhi Hunter Chicken Curry

(18) Goan Chicken Moelho

(19) Jerk Chicken

(20) Kerala Chicken Curry

(21) Malay Chicken Curry

(22) Nagore Chicken Curry

(23) Nonya Chicken Curry

(24) Rizala Chicken

(25) Singapore Style Chicken Curry

(26) Special Chow Mein

(27) Sri-Lankan Curried Chicken

(28) Thai Fried Rice

(29) Thai Green Curry

(30) Trinidadian Curried Chicken

(31) Vietnamese Chicken Curry

(32) Yellow Curried Chicken

Alder Hey Children’s Foundation Trust v Evans

English Family Law

Evans
‘Study of a Hero’s Life’ by Vincent Desiderio

In a heart-rending case concerning the right to life and right to choice of venue with regard to palliative care, the parents of an almost two-year old boy become torn between the stark truth of their son’s condition, and the parental struggle to override the needs of the State, where the only voice missing is that of the child.

Born in spring of 2016, the respondents’ son Alfie James Evans was admitted to the Alder Hey Hospital in December of that year, after their son displayed a number of concerning behaviours that in turn led to various forms of treatment, albeit none of which showed any long-term success, until he was later diagnosed with a mitochondrial disorder, producing a degenerative condition that itself was causing the functional erosion of his brain to the point of almost exhaustion, while also proving elusive as to the exact cause and identifiable epistemology.

As time progressed, their son eventually lapsed into a coma, and thus the decision was broached as to what possible steps were available to both the respondents and the hospital, regards how best to care for their son during the time remaining between the diagnosis, gradual and distressing deterioration, and his eventual passing.

The hospital had initially suggested that a long-term palliative plan might offer a prolonged lifespan, although the ultimate prognosis was that Alfie was now in a semi-vegetative state, and would remain so indefinitely, however the respondents were reluctant to accept the suggested prognosis, and so in December 2017 the applicant NHS Trust sought a judicial declaration in the High Court, to support their conclusion that there was little merit in continuing to keep Alfie under ventilatory support, whereupon the respondents moved to adjourn the hearing.

Having undertaken extensive research around the diagnosis, the respondents argued that previous symptoms were traceable to hydrocephalus, however the brain tissue had continued to degenerate, and whatever now remained was merely water and cerebral spinal fluid, as anticipated by the medical team and relevant expert testimonies. In addition to this, the respondents had advised that Alfie be transferred to the Bambino Gesu hospital in Rome, Italy, where should no treatment prove conclusive, he would again be admitted to a third hospital in Much, Germany, albeit at significant risk to his already fragile health.

While the court extended tremendous sympathy to the plight faced by the respondents, it relied in this instance upon the expert opinion of a Professor Nikolaus Haas of the University Hospital, Ludwig-Maximilians university, Munich, who had previously remarked that:

“Based on the extensive testing already performed, I do agree with the medical teams involved that there are no useful tests that may be performed to improve Alfie’s condition. The genetic testing (i.e. whole genome sequencing) is performed by blood sampling and without any risks for Alfie. These tests may in certain cases be beneficial to delineate a new rare disease as pointed out by the doctors of the Bambino Gesu Hospital. To the best of my knowledge these tests have, even if a new disease is found, never been able to cure a patient with a similar disease pattern as Alfie shows.”

While in Aintree University Hospital NHS Trust v James, Baroness Hale had explained that:

“[T]he focus is on whether it is in the patient’s best interests to give the treatment rather than whether it is in his best interests to withhold or withdraw it. If the treatment is not in his best interests, the court will not be able to give its consent on his behalf and it will follow that it will be lawful to withhold or withdraw it. Indeed, it will follow that it will not be lawful to give it. It also follows that (provided of course they have acted reasonably and without negligence) the clinical team will not be in breach of any duty toward the patient if they withhold or withdraw it.”

And so with full cognisance that Alfie had now lost all sense of vision, hearing, smell and touch response, the court was appointed the painful task of holding that the continued use of ventilation was now an exercise in futility, and that in the best interests of the child, the applicants were free to determine an end date for the treatment.

Relentlessly pursued in the Court of Appeal, Supreme Court and European Court of Human Rights, the previous judgment was consistently upheld, before being heard again in the High Court in order for a decision to be made as to exactly when the palliative care was to cease; however under new representation, the respondents sought a writ of habeas corpus on grounds that Alfie was now being unlawfully detained in Alder Hay hospital against the wishes of the respondents, a contention that was given little credence, and upon which the court relied upon the words of Lady Hale in the Supreme Court hearing, who stressed that:

“A child, unlike most adults, lacks the capacity to make decisions about future arrangements for themselves. Where there is a dispute, it is for the court to make a decision, as it would in respect of an adult without capacity. This is the gold standard by which most of these decisions are reached. It is an assessment of best interests that has been concluded to be perfectly clear.”

Which again concluded that the care plan now in effect was in every respect, in the best interests of their son, and that it was the express desire of the court that the respondents at least help support the medical team assigned his care.

Appealing against the decision under Rule 52.3(1)(a)(iii) of the Civil Procedure Rules, the respondents argued before the Court of Appeal that the High Court had merely continued in its support of the cessation of medical ventilation, instead of clarifying as to the lawfulness of Alfie’s alleged detention at Alder Hay hospital, upon which the Court turned to Gard v United Kingdom, wherin McFarlane J had held that:

“It goes without saying that in many cases, all other things being equal, the views of the parents will be respected and are likely to be determinative. Very many cases involving children with these tragic conditions never come to court because a way forward is agreed as a result of mutual respect between the family members and the hospital, but it is well recognised that parents in the appalling position that these and other parents can find themselves may lose their objectivity and be willing to “try anything”, even if, when viewed objectively, their preferred option is not in a child’s best interests. As the authorities to which I have already made reference underline again and again, the sole principle is that the best interests of the child must prevail and that must apply even to cases where parents, for the best of motives, hold on to some alternative view.”

Thus the Court held again that:

“The application of a different legal label, namely habeas corpus, does not change the fact that the court has already determined the issues which the parents now seek, again, to advance. Their views, their rights do not take precedence and do not give them an “unfettered right” to make choices and exercise rights on behalf of Alfie.”

Before dismissing the appeal on grounds similar to those taken by the High Court; after which an application for the return of Alfie to Italy was presented to the High Court, based upon the granting of Italian citizenship by the Italian Ministry of Foreign Affairs to the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, an act that was immediately refuted both on grounds of lineage and self-evident jurisdiction of the court, the latter of which was shown in Re B (A Child) (Habitual Residence: Inherent Jurisdiction) in which Lord Wilson had explained how:

“A child’s habitual residence in a state is the internationally recognised threshold to the vesting in the courts of that state of jurisdiction to determine issues in relation to him (or her).”

And that:

“Article 8 of Council Regulation (EC) No 2201/2003 (“Regulation B2R”) provides that the courts of an EU State shall have jurisdiction in matters of parental responsibility over a child habitually resident there at the time when the court is seised.”

However the Court also noted that since the last hearing, Alfie had been successfully extubated from the ventilation unit, and was now breathing of his own accord, a change that moved the court to conclude that:

“[T]here arises an opportunity to explore creatively, ambitiously and even though it may be a forlorn hope, cooperatively, the options that may now emerge in a palliative care plan which could encompass, at least theoretically, Alfie being cared for, in his final hours or days, at home or in a hospice, or even on the ward and not in the PICU.”

Upon which the application was dismissed, and the matter now left for the respondents and Alder Hay Hospital to hopefully negotiate as best as possible with the time remaining.

Simmenthal SpA v Italian Minister of Finance

European Law

Simmenthal SpA v Italian Minister of Finance
Image: ‘White Cow in August’ by Sandra Stevens

To read about this case in greater depth, and with the benefit of full OSCOLA referencing, simply purchase a copy of ‘The Case Law Compendium: English & European Law’ from leading booksellers around the world.

Where can I buy it?

The book is available now through most Amazon sites thanks to the brilliance of Print on Demand (POD) technology and it is also printed through Ingram Spark (aka Lightning Source), who, through their worldwide  partnership agreements, supply ‘The Case Law Compendium’ to almost 40,000 retailers, libraries, schools and universities while providing worldwide shipping as standard.

America

Amazon.com, Barnes & Noble

Australia & New Zealand

Booktopia

Britain

 Amazon,   BlackwellWaterstones

Canada

AmazonChapters Indigo

France

Amazon

Germany

Amazon

India

Amazon

Italy

Amazon

Japan

Amazon

Latin America

Amazon Brazil

Amazon Mexico

Spain

Amazon

I cannot emphasise enough just how invaluable this book will become to you as your law course progresses, and you’ll be surprised at just how fast you learn the cases and how your confidence grows when discussing their finer points. I am supremely confident that you will also find yourself returning to the book when studying both for insight and refreshment of knowledge, and I quietly hope you will be equally excited whenever you turn to this unprecedented resource.

Please remember that it was you the worldwide readers, that inspired this book, so you owe it to yourselves to buy it (and use the hell out of it) and to tell your peers and friends everywhere, so that they too can work towards becoming an ‘A‘ student in English law.

– Remember that with ‘The Case Law Compendium’ you can do it.

Electronic Signatures Neil

Francovich and others v Italy

European Law

Francovich and others v Italy
Image: ‘Azov Steel Mill’ by Konstantin Shurupov

To read about this case in greater depth, and with the benefit of full OSCOLA referencing, simply purchase a copy of ‘The Case Law Compendium: English & European Law’ from leading booksellers around the world.

Where can I buy it?

The book is available now through most Amazon sites thanks to the brilliance of Print on Demand (POD) technology and it is also printed through Ingram Spark (aka Lightning Source), who, through their worldwide  partnership agreements, supply ‘The Case Law Compendium’ to almost 40,000 retailers, libraries, schools and universities while providing worldwide shipping as standard.

America

Amazon.com, Barnes & Noble

Australia & New Zealand

Booktopia

Britain

 Amazon,   BlackwellWaterstones

Canada

AmazonChapters Indigo

France

Amazon

Germany

Amazon

India

Amazon

Italy

Amazon

Japan

Amazon

Latin America

Amazon Brazil

Amazon Mexico

Spain

Amazon

I cannot emphasise enough just how invaluable this book will become to you as your law course progresses, and you’ll be surprised at just how fast you learn the cases and how your confidence grows when discussing their finer points. I am supremely confident that you will also find yourself returning to the book when studying both for insight and refreshment of knowledge, and I quietly hope you will be equally excited whenever you turn to this unprecedented resource.

Please remember that it was you the worldwide readers, that inspired this book, so you owe it to yourselves to buy it (and use the hell out of it) and to tell your peers and friends everywhere, so that they too can work towards becoming an ‘A‘ student in English law.

– Remember that with ‘The Case Law Compendium’ you can do it.

Electronic Signatures Neil