The Vegetables section is now finished.

Our Favourite Recipes: A Cookbook for Food Lovers

Vegetables
‘Still Life with Vegetables’ by Yana Golikova

Far and away the biggest section in the forthcoming cookbook ‘Our Favourite Recipes: A Cookbook for Food Lovers’, I am very happy to say that this chapter is now complete, and so it only remains for me to write up the rice, dals, and sides sections, which brings me ever closer to finally having the book ready for publication.

So without further ado, here below are the recipes patiently waiting for you to cook and digest, and remember that they don’t get in without passing muster with my family of discerning diners, so always trust that nothing is left to waste, only to enjoy.

(1) Aromatic Vegetable Curry with Mushrooms and Beans

(2) Artichoke Risotto

(3) Asparagus Risotto

(4) Basmati Rice with Potatoes

(5) Bean Feast

(6) Bean Feast with Salsa

(7) Black-eyed Peas with Coriander and Chilli

(8) Broad Bean and Cauliflower Curry

(9) Butter Bean and Mushroom Casserole

(10) Butter Beans with Mustard and Tomato

(11) Cauliflower and Cashew Curry

(12) Cauliflower and Coconut Milk Curry

(13) Cauliflower in Curry Sauce

(14) Chhole

(15) Chickpea, Courgette and Pepper Stew

(16) Chickpea Curry

(17) Chickpeas in Tea

(18) Chickpea Stew

(19) Chickpea, Sweet Potato and Chili Dhal

(20) Chickpeas in a Coriander Sauce

(21) Chickpeas in a Northern-Style Sauce

(22) Chickpeas with Mushrooms

(23) Chickpeas with Tomatoes and Harissa

(24) Chilli Lentils with Spiced Vegetables

(25) Chilli Pasta Bake with Kidney Beans

(26) Conchigli with Cavalo Nero

(27) Corn and Cashew Curry

(28) Creamed Kidney Beans with Lentils

(29) Curried Kidney Beans

(30) Curried Spinach and Potato with Chillies

(31) Curried Spinach and Chickpeas

(32) Egg and Lentil Curry

(33) Genoese-Style Pasta

(34) Goan Black-eyed Peas with Coconut

(35) Golden Vegetable Paella

(36) Green Beans with Coconut

(37) Hot and Sour Chickpeas

(38) Italian Bean Casserole

(39) Jungle Curry

(40) Kodava Mushroom Curry

(41) Leek, Mushroom and Lemon Risotto

(42) Malaysian Split Pea and Vegetable Curry

(43) Masala Chana

(44) Mixed Bean Curry

(45) Mixed Vegetable Curry

(46) Mixed Vegetable and Macaroni Bake

(47) Moroccan Spaghetti

(48) Mungs Beans with Potatoes

(49) Mushroom Macaroni Cheese

(50) Mushroom Risotto

(51) Pasta with Autumn Tomato Sauce

(52) Pasta with Peas and Parmesan Pasta with Roasted Vegetables

(53) Pasta with Sautéed Vegetables and Tomato Sauce

(54) Pasta with Slow Cooked Cabbage, Parmesan and Pine Nuts

(55) Pasta with Smothered Onion Sauce

(56) Penne All’ Arabiata

(57) Penne with Artichokes

(58) Penne with Peas, Pepper, Proscuitto and Cream

(59) Penne with Tomato and Balsamic Vinegar

(60) Potato and Cauliflower Curry

(61) Potato and Spinach Curry

(62) Red Bean Chilli

(63) Red Beans with Ginger and Chilli

(64) Red Pepper Risotto

(65) Simple Courgette Curry

(66) South Indian Potato Curry

(67) Spaghetti with Garlic Oil and Chilli

(68) Spaghetti with Lemon, Garlic Thyme and Mushrooms

(69) Spaghetti with Raw Tomatoes and Peppers

(70) Spaghetti with Tomato and Basil

(71) Spicy Chickpeas with Cumin Potatoes

(72) Spiced Chickpeas with Sweet Yellow Rice

(73) Spicy Chickpeas with Fresh Ginger

(74) Spiced Kidney Bean Stew

(75) Spicy Chickpeas and Potatoes

(76) Spicy Parsnip and Chickpea Stew

(77) Sri-Lankan Chickpea Curry

(78) Summer Vegetable Risotto

(79) Tagliatelle with Leeks Tomato Biryani

(80) Vegetable Biryani Vegetable Chilli

(81) Vegetable Curry

(82) White Bean Chilli

The criminal law section is now complete.

The Case Law Compendium: United States Law

‘Portrait of Crime’ by Santiago Caruso

Having started work on this legal discipline in July 2018, I am just beyond thrilled to announce that this often harrowing, and yet equally compelling chapter of the United States Case Law Compendium is now well and truly finished.

While I’m aware that I listed the first half of this section in a previous blog post, I thought I would show the whole 122 cases here for convenience (plus it also helps me to acknowledge the sheer scale of this entry), and although I’m happy to be moving on to property law, it’s still an ending for me of sorts, and I can honestly say that it’s been an experience that has deepened my understanding of American criminal law to no end, which is more than I could have anticipated, and so my only wish is that potential readers will feel the same when they invest themselves into the cases studied (or rather simplified).

Anyway, without blathering on too much about it all, here is the criminal law section in all of its glory, and my apologies for such a long post.

1. Anguish v. State

2. Apprendi v. New Jersey

3. Backun v. U.S.

4. Blakely v. Washington

5. Blumenthal v. U.S.

6. Bouie v. City of Columbia

7. Bush v. Commonwealth

8. Carpenter v. U.S.

9. Cheek v. U.S.

10. City of Chicago v. Morales

11. Clark v. Arizona

12. Com. v. Berkowitz

13. Com. v. Fischer

14. Com. v. Milnarich

15. Com. v. Rhodes

16. Com. v. Twitchell

17. Com. v. Webster

18. Com. v. Williams

19. Commonwealth v. Blodgett

20. Cox v. People

21. Davidson v. State

22. Davis v. U.S.

23. Direct Sales Co. v. U.S.

24. Dixon v. State

25. Durham v. U.S.

26. Durland v. U.S.

27. Erwin v. State

28. Ewing v. California

29. Francis v. Franklin

30. Furman v. Georgia

31. Graham v. Connor

32. Graham v. Florida

33. Gregg v. Georgia

34. Harmelin v. Michigan

35. Hendershott v. People

36. Holdridge v. U.S.

37. Hopkins v. State

38. Hopps v. People

39. Hutto v. Davis

40. Jones v. Commonwealth

41. Jones v. City and County of San Francisco

42. Keeler v. Superior Court

43. Kotteakos v. U.S.

44. Lawrence v. Texas

45. Leland v. State of Oregon

46. Liparota v. U.S.

47. Lockett v. Ohio

48. Long v. State

49. McCleskey v. Kemp

50. McDonald v. U.S.

51. McNally v. U.S.

52. Montana v. Egelhoff

53. Mullaney v. Wilbur

54. New York Central & Hudson River Railroad Co. v. U.S.

55. Palmer v. State

56. Papachristou v. City of Jacksonville

57. People v. Barnes

58. People v. Beeman

59. People v. Berry

60. People v. Ceballos

61. People v. Decina

62. People v. Dioguardi

63. People v. Dohring

64. People v. Dorsey

65. People v. Grant

66. People v. Kessler

67. People v. Lauria

68. People v. Lewis

69. People v. Lovercamp

70. People v. Marrero

71. People v. Mayberry

72. People v. Newton

73. People v. Richards

74. People v. Romero

75. People v. Ryan

76. People v. Staples

77. People v. Superior Court

78. Pinkerton v. U.S.

79. Pottinger v. City of Miami

80. Proctor v. State

81. Robinson v. California

82. Rogers v. Tennessee

83. Rummel v. Estelle

84. Sandstrom v. Montana

85. Scott v. Harris

86. Shuttlesworth v. City of Birmingham

87. Skilling v. U.S.

88. Smith v. People of the State of California

89. Staples v. U.S.

90. State v. Adkins

91. State v. Alston

92. State v. Casey

93. State v. Crawford

94. State v. Etzweiler

95. State v. Frazier

96. State v. Green

97. State v. Haney

98. State v. Leidholm

99. State v. Leopold

100. State v. Lima

101. State v. Powell

102. State v. Smith

103. State v. Tally

104. State v. Wanrow

105. State v. Williams

106. Stephenson v. State

107. Tennessee v. Garner

108. Terry v. Ohio

109. Thornhill v. State of Alabama

110. Tot v. U.S.

111. U.S. v. Holmes

112. U.S. v. Booker

113. U.S. v. Contento-Pachon

114. U.S. v. Dotterweich

115. U.S. v. Park

116. U.S. Regent Office Supply Co.

117. U.S. v. Rybicki

118. U.S. v. Teemer

119. U.S. v. U.S. Gypsum Co.

120. U.S. v. X-Citement Video Inc.

121. U.S. v. Zavala Maldonado

122. U.S. v. Weems

 

 

Chhole

Recipes

Chhole
‘Beans Chickpeas’ by Alessandra Andrisani

This is an absolutely simple and yet utterly delicious vegetarian curry that can be easily tempered to suit your spice and heat threshold, while the fresh mint and coriander combination creates a taste that brings you back time and time again.

The added bonus is that this uncomplicated marriage of fresh herbs and tomatoes also wins votes with both adults and children alike, and what’s even more appealing is that it takes very little time to prepare and cook too.

Ingredients (Serves 4)

4 Tbsps of Olive Oil
2 400g Tins of Chickpeas (Drained and Rinsed)
2 Medium Onions (Finely Chopped)
4 Garlic Cloves (Peeled and Grated)
Tbsp Ground Coriander
Tbsp Ground Cumin
Tsp Ground Turmeric
Tsp Garam Masala
Tsp Paprika
4 Whole Vine Tomatoes (Chopped)
Medium Green or Red Chilli (Seeded and Finely Chopped)
25g Pack of Fresh Coriander (Finely Chopped)
Tbsp Fresh Mint (Finely Chopped)
Salt and Freshly Ground Pepper to Taste
500ml Water

How to Cook

1. Heat the oil in a non-stick chef pan (or similar), add the chopped onions and garlic, and stir-fry them until the onions are lightly browned.

2. Add the chopped chilli, cumin, ground coriander, turmeric, paprika and garam masala, and stir well to coat everything.

3. Add the chickpeas, chopped tomatoes, fresh coriander, fresh mint and salt and pepper, bring to the boil, and simmer uncovered for 15-20 minutes, or until the sauce has thickened, and then serve.

Comments
This healthy and incredibly tasty dish goes brilliantly with any rice, however a simple plain basmati rice will easily suffice, and you could also have some nice warmed chapatis and freshly sliced cucumber if preferred.

Lear v. State

US Criminal Law

Lear v. State
‘Buchanan General Store’ by David Boyd

Theft without violence or fear of violence upon the victim cannot constitute robbery, as was demonstrated in this simple case of taking without a vendor’s consent in 1931.

Having entered the store of a Buckeye resident at the point of their opening it, the appellant took the opportunity to make off with a bag containing $33 while the shopkeeper was attending another task nearby, after which he was later arrested and confessed to stealing the money.

Indicted in the Superior Court of Maricopa County, the appellant was then charged and convicted of robbery under § 4602 of the Arizona Revised Statutes, which read that:

“Robbery is the felonious taking of personal property in the possession of another, from his person or immediate presence and against his will, accomplished by means of force or fear. The fear may be either of an unlawful injury to the person or property of the person robbed, or of a relative or member of his family; or of an immediate and unlawful injury to the person or property of any one in the company of the person robbed at the time of the robbery.”

However the appellant challenged the judgment in the Arizona Supreme Court on grounds that there was insufficient evidence to show beyond a reasonable doubt that he had subjected the vendor to any form of physical struggle, or that he had even uttered a single word to him during the act, whereupon the court sought clarification on the definition of robbery, and so turned to the English case of R. v Thomas Gnosil, in which the Court of Assizes had held that:

“[T]he force used must be either before, or at the time of the taking, and must be of such a nature as to shew that it was intended to overpower the party robbed, and prevent his resisting, and not merely to get possession of the property stolen.”

And to State v. Parsons, where the Washington Supreme Court had also held that:

“[I]t is not robbery to merely snatch from the hand or person of another, or to surreptitiously take from another’s pocket, money or some other thing of value, as such taking lacks the element of force, or putting in fear, one or the other of which being essential to constitute the crime of burglary.”

While the court further noted that § 649a of Grigsby’s Criminal Law stated that:

“No sudden taking unawares from the person, even done with force, as by snatching a thing from one’s hand, or out of his pocket, is sufficient to constitute robbery.”

Therefore the court held with considerable certainty that although the vendor had been cause distress as a result of his pecuniary loss, the appellant had on this occasion, been deft enough to avoid confrontation, and so the court reversed the previous judgment and remanded the case back to the superior court while holding that:

“The mere taking of property in possession of another, from his person or immediate presence and against his will, is not robbery. Such taking must be accomplished by force or fear to constitute robbery.”

Mung Beans with Potatoes

Recipes

Mung Beans with Potatoes
‘Basket of Potatoes’ by Vincent Van Gogh

Undoubtedly one of my own personal favourites, this delicious combination of soft tender potatoes, with sweet tomato coated mung beans, never fails to satisfy when I make it, and I’m supremely confident that if you give it a try yourself, you’ll quickly become another fan of this truly ‘moreish’ meal.

Ingredients (Serves 4)
Slug of Olive Oil
175g Mung Beans
2 Medium Potatoes (Peeled and Cut into Small Dice)
Garlic Clove (Peeled and Grated)
1” Fresh Ginger (Peeled and Grated)
400g Tin of Chopped Tomatoes
Tbsp Tomato Purée
0.5 Tsp Cumin Seeds
0.5 Tsp Brown Sugar
6 Curry Leaves (Fresh or Dried)
0.5 Tsp Ground Turmeric
Medium Red or Green Chilli (Seeded and Finely Chopped)
Salt and Freshly Ground Pepper to Taste
750ml Water

How to Cook

1. Add the mung beans to the water and simmer in a small pan for around 30 minutes, draining away any excess liquid when finished.

2. Par-boil the diced potatoes in another small pan for around 9 minutes, draining away any excess liquid when finished.

3. Meanwhile heat the oil in a non-stick chef pan (or similar), add the cumin seeds, shortly followed by the garlic, chilli and ginger, before stir-frying until the garlic is soft but not browned.

4. Add the turmeric, salt and pepper, and sugar, and mix well before stir-frying for a further 1-2 minutes

5. Add the chopped tomatoes and tomato purée, and bring them to the boil before simmering covered for 6-8 minutes, or until the sauce has thickened.

6. Finally add the mung beans and potatoes and gently mix everything together before serving as required.

Comments
This awesome vegetarian dish goes brilliantly with warm chapatis, but is equally delightful with a simple plain basmati rice if preferred.

Inland Revenue Commissioners v Broadway Cottages Trust

English Equity & Trusts

AN
‘Anonymity’ by Ben Will

Uncertainty as to the exact class of trust beneficiary lies central to the disposition and taxation of funds, when after establishing two virtually identical charitable trusts (the Broadway Cottages Trust and the Sunnylands Trust), the nominated trustees and now appellants were faced with claims by the Inland Revenue that any monies generated by the use of the trust were lawfully subject to taxation under the Income Tax Act 1918.

In the summer of 1950, the now deceased settlor bequeathed a sum of £80,000 for the benefit of a number of beneficiaries, while the design was such that the appellants were granted discretionary powers to invest and apply the money, so as to accrue sufficient income for his wife and numerous other parties for the duration of the trust.

However the appellees claimed that clause 8 of the trust instrument was void for uncertainty, on grounds that while it stated in relevant part that:

“[T]he trustees shall hold the income of the trust fund from the date or respective dates from which the trustees shall become entitled to such income upon trust to apply the same for the benefit of all or any one or more of the donor’s said wife and the beneficiaries….

The beneficiary schedule conversely included:

“1. All persons (other than the settlor and any wife of his and any infant child of his) who have been in the past or (as the case may be) at the date of these presents or subsequently thereto at any time during the period ending on December 31, 1980, or during the appointed period whichever shall be the shorter employed by: (a) the settlor; (b) the wife of the settlor; (c) William Timpson deceased (father of the settlor and who died on January 20, 1929); (d) Katherine Chapman Timpson deceased (mother of the settlor and who died on December 16, 1940); (e) William Timpson Limited or by any other limited company which may succeed to the business of William Timpson Limited; (/) Any other limited company of which the settlor is a director at the date of these presents.
2. The wives and widows of any such persons as is specified in cl. 1 of this schedule.
3. All persons (other than the settlor and any wife of his and any infant child of his) who are the issue however remote of the said William Timpson deceased . . . and Charles Henry Rutherford deceased (father of the wife of the settlor and who died on February 17, 1930).
4 , 5, 6, 7. [Certain named persons.]
8. Alastair John Grenville Stevenson and any spouse of his or issue of him.
9. [The trustees of the settlement and their spouses or issue].
10. Joseph Baker and any spouse of his or issue of him.
11. Godchildren of the settlor or his wife.

And so the appellees argued that there was no clear and ascertainable list of beneficiaries upon which to refer, while the appellants contended that the trust afforded them discretionary powers to assign the funds to those parties they believed to be ascertainable, and so the trust remained valid under clause 10, which read in relevant part that:

“The trustees shall also have power during the appointed period to apply the whole or any part of the capital of the trust fund in their discretion for the benefit of all or any one or more of the beneficiaries either by way of advancement on account of his or her or their share or shares or not as the trustees may in their discretion think fit….”

In the first instance, the Inland Revenue Special Commissioners reviewed the claim, and awarded for the respondents, while holding that:

“[T]he trusts of the settlement in so far as they related to the income of the trust fund were not void for uncertainty, and that the trustees under the provisions of cl. 8 of the settlement had a power of selection and that it was a valid and effective trust of the income of the trust fund, and that, accordingly, the sums of money received by the respondents from the trustees were the income of the respondents and thus entitled to the exemption claimed.”

Whereupon the appellees challenged the judgment in the Chancery Court, who allowed the appeal, while instead holding that:

“[I[n cases of an imperative trust to distribute there must be certainty as to the objects.”

Upon which the appellants challenged the judgment in the Court of Appeal, who then relied upon In re Gestetner Settlement, in which the Chancery Court had held that:

“[I]n a case where there is a duty on a trustee to select from a number of persons which of them shall be the recipients of the settlor’s bounty, there must be a certainty as to those recipients.”

Thus the court dismissed the appeal whilst reiterating to the parties that:

“[A] trust for such members of a given class of objects as the trustees shall select is void for uncertainty, unless the whole range of objects eligible for selection is ascertained or capable of ascertainment….”

Haddock with Creamed Leeks, Beans and Parsley

Recipes

Haddock with Creamed Leek, Beans and Parsley

Haddock is a great alternative to cod, and so this simple and yet nourishing dish ought to please most fish lovers, while its composition also proves that simplicity is always the key when cooking, as I am confident you will agree when you eventually get around to trying this recipe for yourself.

Ingredients (Serves 4)
Large Slug of Olive Oil
2 Leeks (Trimmed, Split and Finely Sliced)
4 Decent Sized Fresh Haddock Fillets (Un-skinned)
50g Green Beans (Trimmed and Chopped)
200ml Double Cream
Tsp English Mustard
Handful of Fresh Flat Leaf Parsley
Salt and Freshly Ground Pepper to taste

How to Cook

1. Place the haddock fillets on a plate, brush with a little olive oil and sprinkle with salt and pepper, before setting aside.

2. Heat the oil in a non-stick sauce pan (or similar), add the leeks and beans, and gently fry until soft and tender, straining off any residual liquid that appears.

3. Add the cream, salt and pepper, mustard and gently simmer in the cream until suitably thickened.

4. Add some oil to a non-stick frying pan, and gently fry the haddock fillets until browned underneath.

5. Place the partially cooked fillets on a non-stick roasting tray in the centre of an oven, (preheated to 170°) and continue to cook them for another 3-4 minutes.

6. Remove the fillets, place the cooked vegetables in the center of four plates, gently resting each haddock fillet on top, and then carefully spoon the sauce over the top before serving.

Comments
This particular meal is perfect with a nice side of mashed or roast potatoes, and goes equally well with a crisp leaf salad and chilled white wine, if preferred.