University Moot

Contract Law Moot | 2014

Advocate
‘Three Lawyers’ by Honoré Daumier

I’m only too aware that many law undergraduates often feel somewhat lost and confused when drafting their debut law moot, and so I thought I would publish mine here for those who wish to draw reference, or at the very least guidance from it when preparing themselves for a public argument (albeit inside a university classroom).

Just to provide a little background, I represented the respondents in a contract law ‘frustration’ claim, and yes I won by a clear and wide margin, which instantly confirmed and validated my love for the subject and a deeply ingrained wish to advocate professionally.

Anyway without waffling on, by all means click here and read away, while I can only hope that this post helps somebody somewhere at some point.

 

Back at the helm…

United States Law: A Case Study Collection

Finish Line
‘The Finish Line’ by Guiy Buffet

It’s been a wee while since my last blog post, and yet so much has happened, including a relocation from Cambridge to Cornwall, the commencement of my legal career, countless readjustments, and our annual Christmas preparations, and yet one of the more pressing questions was whether, with all of the work ahead of me now and moving forwards, I would be able to find sufficient time to complete my latest and most ambitious book titled ‘United States Law: A Case Study Collection’.

Having worked out how best to finish this labour of both love and a passion for law, I’m now happy to say that I’ve sketched out a plan that will hopefully bring things to a close sooner rather than later, and so I suppose the real purpose of this post is simply to say that I am now firmly back on track, and feel very confident that the book will be published in the first quarter of 2020.

With little more to add besides my palpable sense of relief at picking up the proverbial thread, I will duly sign off and get cracking, as there’s almost two years of arduous legal research and writing just waiting to be shared with the world.

Oh, and should I forget to say it at any point – “A Happy New Year to all!”

Electronic Signatures Neil

Bolognese Ragù

Beef Recipes

Bolognese Ragù
‘Emilia Romagna, View to Verucchio’ by Johann Pickl

After recently discovering this frankly sublime recipe, I wasted little time in making it for myself before posting it here, and I can testify that the results more than justify the time invested, when after slow cooking it for almost four hours, this dish blew me away with its luscious taste and instant appeal.

I would also add that many people have naively tinkered with these ingredients through a fear that its simplicity might find itself lacking, however I can absolutely assure you that this is exactly what you need and nothing more, while remaining mindful that this is a centuries-old method, so trust that it is perfect and allow yourself to enjoy a beautiful  bowl of Italian cuisine at its very best.

Ingredients (Serves 4)
75g Butter
250g Minced Pork (15-20% fat)
500g Minced Beef (15-20% fat)
300g Tagliatelle
Medium Onion (very finely chopped)
100g Carrots (peeled and very finely diced)
100g Celery ( very finely diced)
Small Bottle Red Wine
3 Tbsps Tomato Purée
125ml Milk
Salt and Freshly Ground Pepper to taste

How to Cook

1. Add the diced pork to a 26cm non-stick chef pan, and gently stir-fry the meat until well cooked and almost moisture free.

2. Add the minced beef to the pork, and brown it slowly while stirring over a medium heat before removing and setting them aside.

3. Melt the butter in the same pan before adding the onions, carrots and celery,  and gently fry them until the onions are soft and almost slightly golden.

4. Add the tomato purée, pork and beef, gently combine everything and simmer gently uncovered for 3-4 minutes, before adding the wine and mixing everything well.

5. Lower the heat, tightly cover the pan with aluminium foil and the lid, and place it on a very gentle simmer for 3 hours, checking every hour and adding a little water where needed.

6. Add the milk, mix well and continue to simmer partially covered for another 40 minutes before seasoning with salt and pepper.

7. Cook the tagliatelle according to the pack instructions, drain and gently combine it with the ragù before serving as required.

Comments
This particular recipe calls for tagliatelle, however you could also serve it with pappardelle and some crusty buttered rolls to soak up the delicious oils left behind.

Cultural Anthropology v Judicial Reasoning

Academia

Cultural Anthropology
‘Trust’ by Rosei Marci

Written during my final year at university, this 12,000 word research project explores the potential for judicial bias when adjudicating fiduciary breaches across four countries including Australia, Canada, United Kingdom and the United States of America.

Having kept this frankly illuminating piece to myself for the last three years, I thought perhaps it was time to share it with those interested or curious enough to view it, while for the record I was delighted to receive a first-class grade for my earnest efforts.

Simply click here should you wish to learn more.

Shepherd’s Pie

Beef Recipes

Shepherd's Pie
‘The Highland Shepherd’ by Rosa Bonheur

Shepherd’s pie has remained our family favourite for many years due to its classic ingredients, and so I can assure you that should you follow this particular recipe you’ll soon discover exactly why this dish looks unlikely to fall from favour in our household anytime soon, and although the preparation requires at least thirty minutes of your time, the end result looks and tastes sublime.

Ingredients (Serves 4)

2 Tbsps Olive Oil
400g Minced Beef
Medium Onion (finely chopped)
2 Beef Stock Cubes
2 Garlic Cloves (peeled and grated)
2 Handfuls of Garden Peas
Tbsp Dried Thyme
0.5 Tsp Mustard Powder
Tbsp Dried Oregano
Tbsp Worcestershire Sauce
Bay Leaf
Tbsp Tomato Purée
Tsp Plain Flour
6-7 Maris Piper Potatoes (peeled)
100g Mature Cheddar Cheese (grated)
Tsp Salt and Freshly Ground Pepper
400g Tin of Chopped Tomatoes
50g Butter
200ml Water

How to Cook

1. Heat the oil in a 26cm non-stick chef pan, and gently fry the onions and garlic until soft and slightly browned.

2. Add the minced beef and brown slowly while stirring.

3. Add the stock cubes, mustard powder, Worcestershire sauce, tomato purée, dried thyme, oregano and salt and pepper, and stir well to mix.

4. Add the peas, chopped tomatoes and water, and simmer partially covered for 30 minutes, stirring occasionally to prevent sticking.

5. Pre-heat your oven to 160°C

6. Cube and par-boil the potatoes for around 10-15 minutes, and then mash with half of the cheddar and all of the butter.

7. Add flour to thicken the meat sauce, and then pour it into a suitably sized casserole dish.

8. Level the meat sauce with a spoon, and then top it with mashed potato, evenly spreading it across the meat, (you can use a fork to create a nice swirling pattern in the potato) before evenly sprinkling the remaining half of the cheese on top.

9. Bake in centre of the oven for 30-35 minutes, placing a baking tray on the shelf below to catch any excess meat sauce that might bubble out during cooking.

10. Remove and let it stand for 5-6 minutes, before serving as required.

Comments
This robust meal goes brilliantly with chopped or sliced carrots and steamed broccoli, while it’s equally delicious with a generous dollop of tomato sauce on the side!

Notes on the 2018 Carillion collapse

Insight | August 2019

Carillion
‘Le Chantier’ by Maximilien Luce

This is a twenty page report detailing the financial collapse of Carillion plc in 2018, and while this independent research explains much of the background leading up to their downfall, it also includes judicial insight into the rights of those left out of pocket when the hammer finally fell (click here to read it).

Mushroom Risotto

Recipes

Mushroom Risotto
‘Mushrooms’ by Albert Kechyan

More a labour of love than a quick meal, risotto is simple in design, and yet without the requisite constant attention you can bargain that it will almost certainly fail to evolve into the silky, almost perfect dining experience it offers, while this recipe exemplifies how just one simple ingredient can lift a risotto to almost heavenly standards, which means you absolutely owe it to yourself to prepare and cook this beautiful meal and share with those you really care about and love in the knowledge that your gesture will not go unnoticed.

Ingredients (Serves 4)

6 Tbsps Olive Oil
150g Butter
250g Mushrooms (sliced)
Medium Red Onion (finely chopped)
3 Garlic Cloves (peeled and grated)
300g Risotto Rice
1 Litre Chicken Stock
Small Bottle of White Wine
2 Tbsps Lemon Juice
25g Pack of Fresh Basil (finely chopped)
150g Parmesan (grated)
Salt and Freshly Ground Pepper to taste

How to Cook

1. Heat half of the olive oil in a 26cm non-stick chef pan, add the mushrooms, stir-fry them until well cooked, and then remove and set them aside, adding any remaining mushroom liquid to the chicken stock.

2. Melt half of the butter in the same pan, add the onions and garlic, and stir-fry both until the onions are soft, but not browned.

3. Meanwhile, add the chicken stock to an 18cm non-stick saucepan, and keep it warm on a low heat while you prep the risotto.

4. Add the white wine to the onions, and reduce by half over a medium heat while stirring.

5. Add the risotto rice to the onions, stir well to coat everything, and add a ladleful of the stock, stirring constantly until the stock has been absorbed by the rice.

6. Continue this process until all of the stock has been added, and the rice is now looking thick and glutenous

7. Gently fold the mushrooms, remaining butter, chopped basil, lemon juice and most of the parmesan into the rice, season with salt and pepper, stirring well to combine the ingredients.

8. Finally cover the pan, turn off the heat, and allow it to sit for 5-6 minutes, before serving as required with a sprinkling of parmesan on each portion.

Comments
When I cook this (and many other types of risotto) for my family, I typically serve it with either a crisp salad, crusty buttered rolls, or both if the appetite is wanting, however it’s just as good served as is, with a nice bottle of white wine to suit your palate.