Inland Revenue Commissioners v Broadway Cottages Trust (1954)

English Equity & Trusts

AN
‘Anonymity’ by Ben Will

Uncertainty as to the exact class of trust beneficiary lies central to the disposition and taxation of funds, when after establishing two virtually identical charitable trusts (the Broadway Cottages Trust and the Sunnylands Trust), the nominated trustees and now appellants were faced with claims by the Inland Revenue that any monies generated by the use of the trust were lawfully subject to taxation under the Income Tax Act 1918.

In the summer of 1950, the now deceased settlor bequeathed a sum of £80,000 for the benefit of a number of beneficiaries, while the design was such that the appellants were granted discretionary powers to invest and apply the money, so as to accrue sufficient income for his wife and numerous other parties for the duration of the trust.

However the appellees claimed that clause 8 of the trust instrument was void for uncertainty, on grounds that while it stated in relevant part that:

“[T]he trustees shall hold the income of the trust fund from the date or respective dates from which the trustees shall become entitled to such income upon trust to apply the same for the benefit of all or any one or more of the donor’s said wife and the beneficiaries….

The beneficiary schedule conversely included:

“1. All persons (other than the settlor and any wife of his and any infant child of his) who have been in the past or (as the case may be) at the date of these presents or subsequently thereto at any time during the period ending on December 31, 1980, or during the appointed period whichever shall be the shorter employed by: (a) the settlor; (b) the wife of the settlor; (c) William Timpson deceased (father of the settlor and who died on January 20, 1929); (d) Katherine Chapman Timpson deceased (mother of the settlor and who died on December 16, 1940); (e) William Timpson Limited or by any other limited company which may succeed to the business of William Timpson Limited; (/) Any other limited company of which the settlor is a director at the date of these presents.
2. The wives and widows of any such persons as is specified in cl. 1 of this schedule.
3. All persons (other than the settlor and any wife of his and any infant child of his) who are the issue however remote of the said William Timpson deceased . . . and Charles Henry Rutherford deceased (father of the wife of the settlor and who died on February 17, 1930).
4 , 5, 6, 7. [Certain named persons.]
8. Alastair John Grenville Stevenson and any spouse of his or issue of him.
9. [The trustees of the settlement and their spouses or issue].
10. Joseph Baker and any spouse of his or issue of him.
11. Godchildren of the settlor or his wife.”

And so the appellees argued that there was no clear and ascertainable list of beneficiaries upon which to refer, while the appellants contended that the trust afforded them discretionary powers to assign the funds to those parties they believed to be ascertainable, and so the trust remained valid under clause 10, which read in relevant part that:

“The trustees shall also have power during the appointed period to apply the whole or any part of the capital of the trust fund in their discretion for the benefit of all or any one or more of the beneficiaries either by way of advancement on account of his or her or their share or shares or not as the trustees may in their discretion think fit….”

In the first instance, the Inland Revenue Special Commissioners reviewed the claim, and awarded for the respondents, while holding that:

“[T]he trusts of the settlement in so far as they related to the income of the trust fund were not void for uncertainty, and that the trustees under the provisions of cl. 8 of the settlement had a power of selection and that it was a valid and effective trust of the income of the trust fund, and that, accordingly, the sums of money received by the respondents from the trustees were the income of the respondents and thus entitled to the exemption claimed.”

Whereupon the appellees challenged the judgment in the Chancery Court, who allowed the appeal, while instead holding that:

“[I[n cases of an imperative trust to distribute there must be certainty as to the objects.”

Upon which the appellants challenged the judgment in the Court of Appeal, who then relied upon In re Gestetner Settlement, in which the Chancery Court had held that:

“[I]n a case where there is a duty on a trustee to select from a number of persons which of them shall be the recipients of the settlor’s bounty, there must be a certainty as to those recipients.”

Thus the court dismissed the appeal whilst reiterating to the parties that:

“[A] trust for such members of a given class of objects as the trustees shall select is void for uncertainty, unless the whole range of objects eligible for selection is ascertained or capable of ascertainment….”

In re Baden’s Deed Trusts (No.2) (1972)

English Equity & Trusts

Baden's Deed Trusts
‘Il Quarto Stato’ by Guiseppe Pellizza da Volpedo

In what was to become an overly protracted and yet hotly debated case, the question of trust instrument validity and the limiting scope of trust powers, fell upon the English courts to answer, when what appeared at the time was judicial wisdom, later proved a confused doctrine that polluted similar cases in the years following its declaration.

Having become the director of a highly successful M&E company first established in 1927, and as a man of inherent providence, the deceased had taken it upon himself to draft a trust deed in 1941, that would allow his current and former employees to benefit from financial gifts on a potentially recurring basis, while in addition to this their immediate relatives were also to enjoy similar windfalls, as was contained in clause 9(a) of the trust, which read that:

“The trustees shall apply the net income of the fund in making at their absolute discretion grants to or for benefit of any of the officers and employees or ex-officers or ex-employees of the company or to any relatives or dependants of any such persons in such amounts at such times and on such conditions (if any) as they think fit and any such grant may at their discretion be made by payment to the beneficiary or to any institution or person to be applied for his or her benefit and in the latter case the trustees shall be under no obligation to see the application of the money…”

However upon his death in 1960, the appointed executors notified the trustees that the trust was void for uncertainty, as it would be almost impossible to distinguish one employee from another, never mind any relatives known to exist at the time of his passing, which was a position adopted in light of the company’s growth from 110 to 1,300 employees during the preceding years.

Commencing by way of an originating summons in 1967, the trustees argued that clause 9(a) merely represented a power to distribute funds to a class of beneficiaries, while the executors held that the use of the word ‘shall’ created instead, a mandatory trust that once unable to be fully executed, would nullify itself and thus fall within the residual estate.

In the first instance, the Court of Chancery examined the construction of the deed, and found that due to discretionary nature of clause 9(a), the trust conferred a power upon the trustees, and not an immutable instruction that once unfulfilled, rendered the trust void for uncertainty; a statement upon which the executors challenged the findings in the Court of Appeal.

Here, the court referred to In re Gestetner Settlement, in which Harman J had held that when ascertaining the exactness of a trust deed beneficiary class:

“[T]he trustees must worry their heads to survey the world from China to Peru…”

Which was to suggest an immense undertaking for trustees, unless it could be proven that the deed conferred a mere power, in which case, reasonable certainty of the beneficiary class ought then be shown. In light of this precedent, the court subsequently held that as before, the context of clause 9(a) was such that the trustees were afforded discretionary powers, and so held that:

“[C]lause 9 of the deed may properly be construed as the judge did, by holding that it creates a power and not a trust…”

At which point the executors along with the deceased’s widow, pursued their argument before the House of Lords on grounds that clause 9(a) represented a mandatory trust, and that as such, the ruling in the recent Inland Revenue Commissioners v Broadway Cottages directed the decision of the court when it held that:

“[A] trust for such members of a given class of objects as the trustees shall select is void for uncertainty, unless the whole range of objects eligible for selection is ascertained or capable of ascertainment…”

Which it was argued, was now impossible due to the vast number of both former and existing employees, causal employees and extended family members; a contention that left the House allowing the appeal by way of reference back to the Chancery Court for greater clarification, while also holding that in their opinion:

“[T]he trust is valid if it can be said with certainty that any given individual is or is not a member of the class.”

Once again in 1972, the court reviewed the position on the wording, and thereby meaning of trusts and powers, along with the validity of the trust in relation to s.164 of the Law of Property Act 1925, which stipulated that:

“1. No person may by any instrument or otherwise settle or dispose of any property in such manner that the income thereof shall…be wholly or partially accumulated for any longer period than one of the following…(a)the life of the grantor or settlor; or (b) a term of twenty one years from the death of the grantor, settlor or testator…” 

And so with a thoughtful, albeit exhaustible, examination of the deed, the court held that a discretionary trust did exist, and that despite the 31 years since its execution, such an instrument was valid when called into purpose, which echoed the sentiment of the House when the court further held that the trust was valid on the principle that there were sufficient company records to show, and thereby establish, who was reasonably eligible for the benefit of the funds when distributed by the trustees, upon which the executors challenged the judgment before the Court of Appeal one final time.

Here, the executors argued that unless an individual could not be proven as falling outside the scope of the trust, the trust must fail, while the court reasoned that while operating within the bounds of practicality, the trustees had shown that they were equipped to trace staff records back to the inception of the company, and thereby allocate the majority of employees and their immediate relatives, whereupon the court conclusively dismissed the appeal, while simply holding that:

“[A] trust for selection will not fail simply because the whole range of objects cannot be ascertained.”

Burrough v Philcox (1840)

English Succession Law

Burrough v Wilcox
‘The Writing Of The Will’ by Christian Ludwig Bokelmann

The intention to bequeath when drafting a well organised and thoroughly considered will remains the deciding authority of the testator, and so when perhaps vital elements to that redistribution are left wanting, the power falls to the court to compel the wishes of the deceased in as full a manner as possible, as was found in this potentially convoluted suit.

Having given tremendous thought to the lifetime of his estate, and the unavoidable dilemma of untimely deaths, the deceased had made express stipulations as to the execution of his legacy should his immediate  progeny die, while this caveat was made clear by the words:

“[I]n case my son and daughter should both of them die without leaving lawful issue, then for the said estates to be disposed of as shall be hereinafter mentioned (that is to say), the longest liver of my two children shall have power, by a will, properly attested, in writing, to dispose of all my real and personal estates amongst my nephews and nieces or their children, either all to one of them, or to as many of them as my surviving child shall think proper.”

And so in the sad event that his two children were unable to live long enough to bear children, or oversee the disposition of his estate as he had wished, the matter was presented to the Court of Chancery, so as to establish if when dying, the power to assign to those in vivo was relinquished, or if the estate was to remain in trust for the benefit of those now dead.

After much deliberation, and a reinvestigation of a number of arguable precedents, the court turned to Brown v Higgs, in which it was held that within circumstances where those granted executory powers have passed, the will itself becomes a mere trust, and therefore:

“[T]he trustee having died without executing it, or transgressing it, or refusing to execute it, shall not prevent its being held an absolute benefit for the objects, with a power to give a preference.”

Thus the court held that where a will or codicil is deliberate enough to provide express use of its power, the court is granted proper authority to ensure that its instructions are followed both with judicial impartiality and honest justiciability, therefore the will was enforced and the proper class of beneficiaries shown due privilege, while the court also held that:

“[W]hen there appears a general intention in favour of a class, and a particular intention in favour of individuals of a class to be selected by another person, and the particular intention fails, from that selection not being made, the Court will carry into effect the general intention in favour of the class.”

Barclays Bank Ltd v Quistclose Investments Ltd (1968)

English Equity & Trusts

Barclays Bank Ltd v Quistclose Investments Ltd
Image: ‘Bankers in Action’ by Remedios Varo

Conditional lending, while perhaps overlooked during commercial and personal loans, forms the bedrock of such delicate transactions, and so should the borrower find themselves unable to apply the funds as expected, the nature of the agreement remains lawfully intact in favour of the lender. In this matter, an insolvent debtor’s bank attempted to convert such monies into company assets at the expense of the lender, at which point the reassurance of equity intervened.

In 1964, the shareholders of a relatively successful enterprise took steps to issue dividends of around £210,000, however upon inspection, they discovered that without adequate liquidity, the payment would be impossible. With that in mind, the company owner secured a conditional loan from the respondents, on the express condition that the funds were to be used for dividend issue only.

Once received, the owner wrote to the company bank, giving instruction to open a standalone account for the retention of the funds, while stipulating that:

“We would like to confirm the agreement reached with you this morning that this amount will only be used to meet the dividend due on July 24, 1964.”

Unfortunately, on July 17 1964, the company entered into voluntary liquidation, whereupon the monies held remained unused, as per the instructions given at the point of receipt. Some time later, the respondents demanded repayment of the money loaned, after which the appellant bank argued that it had since become a corporate asset, and was therefore subject to the priorities of all associated creditors involved in the bankruptcy process.

At the point of litigation, the respondents held that the money loaned was subject to a resulting trust, and that the bank by virtue of their position, were now under a fiduciary liability as constructive trustees for the amount loaned. In the first hearing, the judge awarded in favour of the appellants, on grounds that equitable principles did not apply when arms-length dealings fail, whereupon the respondents appealed and the Court held that in matters involving third parties to a failed transaction, recovery under equity was a principle long enjoyed, and routinely evidenced through a number of judgments across hundreds of years.

Presented again to the House of Lords, the House examined the complexity of the transaction, and noted that in Toovey v Milne, Abbot CJ had ruled that failure to apply the money loaned in the way originally intended, allowed for recovery of the funds during insolvency, under the principle that:

“[T]his money was advanced for a special purpose, and that being so clothed with a specific trust, no property in it passed to the assignee of the bankrupt. Then the purpose having failed, there is an implied stipulation that the money shall be repaid.”

Here again, reference was made to the express conditions applied to the loan, as well as the statement made in the letter at the time the money was passed to the appellant bank. It was further noted that while in circumstances where the lender agrees to loan on non-specific terms, there is an implied assumption that such funds become part of the corporate estate (albeit not entirely free of equity), however on this occasion there was ample testimony that the respondents had bargained with the borrowers on clear conditions, therefore the House uniformly and unreservedly held that the Appeal Court decision was to remain untouched and the bank’s appeal dismissed.

Bray v Ford (1896)

English Equity & Trusts

Bray v Ford
Image: ‘Advocate’ by Honore Daumier

Profiting from a fiduciary position, while not expressly forbidden, is a feature that requires careful consideration by both trustees and beneficiaries, and so in this matter the billing of fees for legal services proved both offensive and damaging for the party accused.

In 1895, the Governor of the Yorkshire College took issue with the vice-chairman after discovering that he had for a period of fourteen years, been providing legal function as a solicitor whilst holding a position based upon a voluntary footing. Incensed at this opportunistic behaviour, the now appellant wrote a lengthy letter to the respondent, accusing him of breaching his fiduciary duty to the institution her served, while stressing that he had:

“[U]sed religious, educational and philanthropic schemes as a hypocritical cover for the purpose of serving his own ends.”

The respondent argued that the terms of the memorandum of association had provided him with rights to both charge and profit from his work, a contention that remained largely unproven at the point of litigation. In the first hearing, the judge underemphasised the importance of the accusation levelled, instead focussing on the libellous tone used in the letter, which at the time, was circulated amongst three hundred other college governors.

Having convinced the jury that the respondent was justified in his collection of payment for legal services, the judge again placed greater weight upon the damaging effects of the written statements, after which the jury returned a verdict in favour of the respondent, and with damages set at a lofty 600l.

Upon appeal, the appellant was left facing a similar outcome after the Court agreed that the libel charges remained as effective as they would have should the respondent have been proved wrong, thus prompting a final plea before the House of Lords.

Here, the roots of the matter were revisited, along with Order XXXIX r.6 of the Rules of the Supreme Court 1883, which explained how:

“[A] new trial shall not be granted on the ground of misdirection or of the improper admission or rejection of evidence,…unless in the opinion of the Court to which the application is made some substantial wrong or miscarriage has been thereby occasioned in the trial…”

It was thus uniformly agreed by the House that from the outset, the nature of the action had been grossly overlooked in favour of aspersions, and that the trial judge had clearly failed to acknowledge the gravity of a fiduciary breach, which if proven correct, went some way to justifying the claims made by the appellant at the start. It was for this reason that the House held that there had been a clear miscarriage of justice, and that in failing to recognise this, the Court of Appeal had conversely erred in judgment.

In light of these collective mishaps, the House duly reversed the Court of Appeal’s decision, directed a re-trial under the Supreme Court Rules, and ordered repayment of all courts costs and damages to the appellant.

Executors, Gifts and Trustees within English Succession Law

Academia

Executors, Gifts and Trustees in Succession Law
Image: ‘Reading the Will’ by Frederick William Elwell

Executors, Gifts and Trustees in Succession Law

Blackwell v Blackwell

English Equity & Trusts

Blackwell v Blackwell
Image: ‘The Artist’s Mistress’ by Charles Sims

Verbal instructions that are then attested and complied with by the named trustees before the death of a testator, fall neatly between the rules of wills and probate and the equitable field of trust law. On this occasion, the wish of a dying man was such that a large sum of money was to be held upon trust for a party outside of his marriage while unknown to his widow.

Having long agonised over his duty to make provisions for a mother and a child borne out of wedlock, it was decided by the testator to set aside several thousand pounds in the wish that five of his closest friends would act as trustees with the express purpose of investing the funds for the benefit of the two named parties, until such time that the trustees elected to provide them with two thirds of the initial sum, before placing the remaining third back into the residuary estate of his final will.

Upon his death, his widow discovered the bequest, and looked to dismiss its validity upon grounds of fraud and contradiction to the terms of the will where his widow and their son were to benefit from his entire estate. As was common to domestic legislation, s.9 of the Wills Act 1837 read that no will (or codicil) shall be valid unless set in writing and signed by the testator in accordance with statute. On this occasion, the instructions given by the deceased were initially verbal, and only put to writing by means of a memorandum drafted by his solicitor, who himself signed as a trustee and submitted it in support of the codicil.

Using the terms contained within the 1837 Act, it was argued that while the trust memorandum was written, the execution of the codicil was oral, and therefore fell outside the powers granted beneficiaries, unless it was in effect, designed to stand for the sole benefit of the widow through the residual estate; in which case the trustees would be acting in fraud should they look to enforce the terms of the codicil.

While decided twice in favour of the trustees, it was later put before the House of Lords, where the rules of equity were scrutinised in conjunction with proven case law. Having examined the principle that ‘equity will not permit statute to be used as a cloak for fraud’, it was found that where a testator propounds a desire to execute a trust, and then proceeds to provide explicit instruction as to its use, any argument that seeks to undermine the intentions of that person through the use of legislation, must then find themselves party to fraud if they would instead stand to benefit from the funds expressly requested for the enjoyment of another.

In circumstances such as these, it was historically preferred that equity imputes the same responsibility as that agreed to by the original trustee, so that they would then act under the same instructions so as to permit the objective of the deceased to be realised, while this transference effectively circumvents the fraud and makes right, that which is prima facie claimed wrong.

Resting upon this proven application of jurisprudence, the presiding Lords established that far from looking to dissect the flaws proposed by the appellants, it was clear that any conflict arising from a lack of signatory validation, was insufficient when looking to overrule the will of the testator against a trust that by all accounts, left no illusions as to its purpose and means of delivery, and so awarded for the trustees while holding that:

“[V]erbal or written instructions communicated by a testator to a legatee and assented to by him create an enforceable trust…”